Industrials Sector | Reuters.com

SEOUL, Feb 25 Plans for the first contact

between North Korea and the United States after President Donald

Trump took office were cancelled after the U.S. State Department

denied a visa for the top envoy from Pyongyang, the Wall Street

Journal reported on Saturday.

Feb 24 2017

LIMA, Feb 24 Grana y Montero’s

shares closed down about 33 percent on Friday after a local

magazine reported that the Peruvian construction group knew

about $20 million in bribes paid to a former president by its

partner, scandal-tainted Brazilian firm Odebrecht SA.

WASHINGTON, Feb 24 The U.S. Customs and Border

Protection agency said on Friday it will accept proposals next

month for the design of a wall to be built near the U.S.-Mexican

frontier, a first step in picking vendors for President Donald

Trump’s proposed border wall.

Feb 24 2017

MONTREAL, Feb 24 The chief executive of Canada’s

second largest pension fund, which owns a 30 percent stake in

Bombardier Inc.’s transportation division, said on

Friday he hopes that a dispute between the company and Toronto’s

transportation agency over a rail car contract will be resolved

out of court.

http://www.reuters.com/sectors/industrials

Virtual Reality and Exoskeleton Help Paraplegics Partially Recover, Study Finds

Virtual reality may mostly be used for gaming or entertainment, but researchers have discovered a stunning side-effect that suggests it may help restore feeling and movement in patients with seemingly irreversible spinal cord injuries, a new study shows.

Researchers at Duke University were able to return some muscle movement and sensation in paraplegic patients after simultaneously using virtual reality and brain-controlled robotics to attempt an experimental rehab therapy, according to a small study published today in Scientific Reports by Nature.

“Linking brains to machines directly and providing feedback, we may have created a potential rehab therapy,” said Dr. Miguel Nicolelis, co-author of the study and the founder of the Center for Neuroengineering at Duke University and Duke School of Medicine professor in neuroscience.

Researchers used virtual reality and robotic exoskeletons to help train patients to use their thoughts to move. Patients first trained using the virtual reality to mimic walking through an avatar.

The device used is called Brain-Machine Interface, a computer system that records brain signals from human thoughts. The computer translates the recordings into commands to output devices. Patients had to imagine themselves making lower limb movements and then electrical signals from the brain were translated to the computer and moved each patients’ avatar on the virtual reality screen. As their digital counterpart took a step, the patient felt the thud of the foot in their arm via an electrical signal.

Researchers at Duke University were able to return some muscle movement and sensation in paraplegic patients by after simultaneously using virtual reality and brain-controlled robotics to attempt an experimental rehab therapy.

After that initial training, patients then used the same technique while wearing a robotic exoskeleton. The device allowed the patient to “walk” with the help of the machinery as they controlled the machine with their mind.

However, the most thrilling aspect of the study was completely unexpected. After using the exoskeleton, some patients started to regain some sensation and some muscle movement on their own.

“Everybody was stunned to see the footage of these movements,” Nicolelis said. The patients “could see how science could help.”

One patient, previously unable to stand due to a spinal cord injury, became capable of walking using a walker, braces and the assistance of a therapist, according to the study. This was all the more surprising because of the severity of the patients’ injuries.

The eight patients in the study had been clinically diagnosed with a spinal cord injury at least one year prior to the study. Seven patients had a complete injury as classified by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale, and one patient had an incomplete injury.

Both researchers and patients were overwhelmed by the unexpected results seen in all eight patients.

Researchers theorize that their intense training protocol may trigger an “awakening” of the surviving nerves that remain intact below the spinal cord injury level but are dormant.

“I am very hopeful that we will be able to share these details with spinal rehab centers around the world,” Nicolelis said. “If it works with spinal cord injuries, it may work with other injuries such as stroke.”

Researchers continue to see improvements in functional recovery in patients who have continued training after the first 12 months, Nicolelis said. More research will be needed to confirm these results from the small study and to better understand the mechanism that may have allowed these patients to recover some movement and sensation below their spinal injury.

Alexandra Bennewith, vice president of government relations at the nonprofit United Spinal Cord Injury Association, said the technology sounded “amazing” but that it needed to be proven to help people on a larger scale.

“I hope that the study shows that is it has long-lasting effects that can be broadened to more individuals,” she said. “There is a such a clamoring need for new trials, new innovations, new technologies. … People are willing to try things if it will help them gain more functional ability.”

Dr. Shakira Sanchez-Collins is an internal medicine/urban health resident at Johns Hopkins Hospital and is currently working at the ABC News Medical Unit.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/virtual-reality-exoskeleton-paraplegics-partially-recover-study-finds/story?id=41297951

Medrobotics® Closes $20MM Financing To Expand Into General Surgery And Build Next Generation Robot System

RAYNHAM, Mass.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Medrobotics Corp., a medical products company, today announced closing a

$20 Million Preferred Stock financing. Existing Medrobotics shareholders

participated in the round. Proceeds will be used to fund the Company’s

expansion into new surgical applications, such as single-port general

and gynecological surgeries, and to develop its next generation Flex®

Robotic System with more fully robotic instrument options.

Medrobotics will continue to pursue scarless ENT, colorectal and

gynecological procedures to be performed through natural body orifices

with the world’s first and only commercially released steerable and

shapeable robotic surgical products. Additionally, the Company will

develop the Flex® Robotic System for single port abdominal

applications for a variety of difficult to reach procedures in general

surgery, urology, and gynecology.

The Flex® Robotic System has been cleared for ENT procedures

in the United States and internationally. Last year, Medrobotics became

the first robotic company to obtain regulatory clearance for minimally

invasive, flexible robotic products for colorectal procedures in Europe

and Asia. The Flex® Robotic System is now the first robotic

surgical platform offering the ability to access hard to reach anatomy

in both otolaryngology and colorectal procedures without the limits

imposed by straight rigid instruments.

About Medrobotics

Medrobotics Corporation (www.Medrobotics.com)

is a privately funded medical device company headquartered in Raynham,

Massachusetts. The Company manufactures and markets the Flex®

Robotic System, the world’s first robotic surgical platform with a

steerable and shapeable robotic scope. The Flex® Robotic

System offers surgeons the unique ability to navigate complex anatomy

minimally invasively and operate in hard-to-reach anatomical locations

that might otherwise be inaccessible with straight, rigid surgical

tools. The Company’s is committed to providing more patients access to

advanced, minimally invasive surgery. Medrobotics received FDA clearance

for the Flex® Robotic System in July 2015, and the CE mark in

March 2014. The System is not yet cleared for colorectal applications in

the US.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170220005705/en/Medrobotics-Closes-20MM-Financing-Expand-General-Surgery

The Big Three: Automation, Nationalism, Social Expectations

As we close out a turbulent 2016 and look to 2107, what do horizon scanners see in the years ahead?

As part of a horizon scan for the Milken Institute, we asked a diverse group of forecasters, futurists, corporate strategists and business leaders to identify emerging trends impacting corporate leaders over the next 5 years.

Released today at the Milken Institute London Summit, these horizon scanners identified 3 BIG, emerging trends:

1. Automation (and income inequality)

2. Globalism vs. Nationalism

3. Meeting Shifting Social Expectations

For a quick look, a summarizing infographic can be found here.

Economists have been studying so-called “technological unemployment” for a very long time. And automation has been in the news. But, these horizon scanners are concerned that the rate of automation will create social shockwaves. Nationalist-Populist leaders across the globe have been blaming foreign workers, unfair trade deals and big businesses for wage stagnation. It is much harder to blame automation – robots and algorithms. Interestingly, many of these horizon scanners believe that automation will reduce globalization. With wage rates a much lower cost of production, manufacturing may be relocalized – reducing global trade flows. How will corporate leaders navigate this emerging trend and communicate on it?

Tied closely to this is the rising tension between populist-nationalism and globalization. If globalization is the free(er) global flow of ideas, goods, money and people, then 21st century nationalism appears skeptically bracing against at least three of four. This presents distinct challenges for multi-national corporations and those running global business lines with production, distribution and sales across many countries.

The third large trend is the struggle for leaders to meet evolving social norms around corporate responsibility, resource use, accountability, transparency and board diversity.

The top ten trends are also instructive:

1. Income Inequality

2. Resurgent Nationalism

3. Automation

4. Rise of Global Middle Class

5. Artificial Intelligence

6. Social Unrest

7. Internet of Things

8. Consumer Power

9. Resource Scarcity

10. Aging

21st Century leaders will need deep wisdom and flexibility to navigate these ten trends.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/robert-moran/the-big-three-automation_b_13465154.html

ISIS “industrial” weapons production in Mosul with supply from Turkey revealed as Iraq forces advance

As Iraqi army and allied forces push ISIS militants back from Mosul, their last major stronghold in Iraq, the industrial-scale weapons manufacturing capabilities the group has enjoyed are being revealed.

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s weapons production was highly organized and sophisticated, relying on a “robust and reliable” supply chain from across the border in Turkey, according to a report by the London-based Conflict Armament Research group (CAR).

“The degree of organization, quality control and inventory management indicates a complex, centrally controlled industrial production system,” the report found.

CAR executive director James Bevan told the Associated Press that ISIS’ loss of ground around Mosul, where they’ve been beaten back from surrounding towns and villages and squeezed into the city center, means the group has lost the ability to manufacture weapons on an industrial scale.

He warned, however, that the terror group has likely already moved most of its senior weapons experts out of Mosul and into their territory across the border in Syria, so the threat still exists.

Any significant supply route from Turkey, to the north, into Mosul has also likely been cut off or seriously impacted as such a route would have to traverse Kurdish territory along the border, and Kurdish militias are among the allied forces beating ISIS back into the center of Mosul from that direction.

CAR noted, however, that some materials used by ISIS to make bombs and mortars were sourced from as far away as western Europe; Sorbital and sugar used in propellants from France and Lebanon, and potassium nitrate from Latvia, for example.

CAR’s researchers went into reclaimed areas east of Mosul with Iraqi forces and found stocked, labeled and ready-to-ship munitions, reflecting the elaborate production process that enabled ISIS militants to remain on the offensive — with bomb and mortar attacks on population centers and targeting security forces — during their now two-year-old insurgency in northern Iraq and Syria.

U.S. military commanders have expressed confidence that Iraqi forces will retake Mosul in the new year, and they are now focusing efforts with European allies on how to help the Iraqis keep ISIS out of Iraq’s second largest city once the militants are evicted.

© 2016 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/isis-industrial-weapons-production-mosul-supply-turkey-iraq/

America’s 20 Fastest-Growing Jobs May Surprise You

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is out with its most recent ranking of the 20 fastest-growing occupations in the U.S.. Coming in at #1, with median pay of $83,580 a year and a growth rate of 53 percent between now and 2022: “Industrial-organizational psychologists.” What the heck is that?

Whatever it is, its growth rate beats that of every other occupation, including personal care aids (49 percent), home health aides (48 percent), diagnostic medical sonographers (46 percent), stonemasons (43 percent), stone masons laying down “segmented paving stones” (38 percent) and the members of 14 other fast-growing occupations.

The Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology says its members are versatile scientists “specializing in human behavior in the workplace.” Employers hire them–either in-house or as consultants–because their expertise results in better hires, increased productivity, reduced turnover, and lower labor costs.

Says the BLS, “Industrial-organizational psychologists [I-O psychologists] apply psychology to the workplace by using psychological principles and research methods to solve problems and improve the quality of work life. They study issues such as workplace productivity, management or employee working styles and employee morale. They also work with management on matters such as policy planning, employee screening or training and organizational development.”

In short, you hire I-O psychs to improve the efficiency of your organization. Unlike many other kinds of consultants you might hire, they can show causality between their contribution and improved performance of your business.

Henry Kasper, the BLS supervisor who tracks this occupation, tells ABC News that it’s one of the smallest that BLS follows: There are maybe 1,600 such psychologists. Though their job growth is indeed forecast to be robust, total growth between now and 2022 is only 900 jobs.

Nonetheless, says Kasper, “Companies see they can get a lot of benefit from hiring them (I-O psychologists) on a contract basis. They come in and help improve productivity. The trend is up–and in a pretty significant way. Given it’s so small, you don’t need to add that many jobs to get a massive percentage increase.”

Tracy Kantrowitz, an I-O psychologist and director of R&D for consulting firm SHL, says she wasn’t surprised by BLS’s ranking her profession #1. “It’s consistent with what we’ve seen in recent years,” she tells ABC News. “Applications to grad schools are way up.” A masters degree in psychology or a doctorate are important–if not essential–prerequisites to getting hired, she says.

A number of other fast-growing occupations, as defined by BLS, require no degree and involve far bigger numbers of workers. Personal care aides and home health aides will be needed to care for the ever-swelling tide of aging Baby Boomers. Diagnostic medical sonographers will be in demand because the technology of sonography is advancing rapidly: it provides a way to look inside the body without subjecting it to radiation, as with X-rays.

Certain building trades jobs will advance as that industry recovers, and because these jobs enjoy special advantages within the trade. Segmental pavers will be in demand, says BLS’s Kasper, because prefabricated, interlocking paving stones present a cheaper alternative to concrete.

Herewith, the top 20 fastest-growing occupations between now and 2022, as defined by BLS:

OCCUPATION, GROWTH RATE, 2012 MEDIAN PAY

Industrial-organizational

Psychologists, 53 percent: $83,580

Personal care aides, 49 percent: $19,910

Home health aides, 48 percent: $20, 820

Insulation Workers,

Mechanical, 47 percent: $39,170

Interpreters &

Translators, 46 percent: $45,430

Diagnostic medical

sonographers, 46 percent: $65,860

Helpers–Brickmasons,

blockmasons, stonemasons

and tile and marble

setters, 43 percent: $28,220

Occupational therapy

assistants, 43 percent: $53,240

Genetic Counselors, 41 percent: $56,800

Physical therapist

assistants, 41 percent: $52,160

Physical therapist

aides, 40 percent: $23,880

Skincare specialists, 40 percent: $28,640

Physiciian

assistants, 38 percent: $90,930

Segmental pavers, 38 percent: $33,720

Helpers-

electricians, 37 percent: $27,670

Information

security analysts, 37 percent: 86,170

Occupational

therapy aides, 36 percent: $26,850

Health specialties

teachers, post-

secondary, 36 percent: $81,140

Medical secretaries, 36 percent: $31,350

Physical therapist, 36 percent: $79,860

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/americas-20-fastest-growing-jobs-surprise/story?id=22364716

RIA – Robotics Online – Industrial Robot Automation

Automate 2017

Visit North America’s Broadest Automation Solutions Show

Automate 2017Whether you’re new to automation or are an experienced user, Automate has the solutions for you! Taking place April 3-6, 2017 at McCormick Place in Chicago, Automate offers the opportunity to connect with industry experts and over 300 exhibitors.

While at the show, be sure to attend the Automate Conference, featuring the 48th Annual International Symposium on Robotics. The Automate Conference offers everything from a basic understanding of automation to more advanced topics in courses taught by industry professionals.

To learn more about Automate and to register for the show and conference, visit the Automate website.

http://www.robotics.org/

Automation can revitalize the U.S. workforce

In the face of growing workplace automation, a number of commentators have painted a grim future for American workers. But most human capital leaders see a much brighter future– one where automation helps revitalize U.S. manufacturing and increases the demand for skilled workers.

According to global talent management firm Randstad Sourceright’s survey of over 400 corporate HR leaders, automation and robotics are likely to have a positive impact on U.S. business growth in 2017, and will be one of the driving forces behind new hiring trends over the next several years. 

Regardless of how you feel about robots, the move toward automation and artificial intelligence cannot be stopped.  About 15 percent of global HR leaders say that robotics completely transformed their businesses in 2016, and more than double (31%) expect automation to have an even greater influence in 2017.     

Rather than feeling threatened by this new technology, nearly two-thirds (65%) of the HR leaders we spoke with said they see artificial intelligence and robotics having a positive impact on their businesses over the next three to five years.  Across all the major industry sectors surveyed, respondents were optimistic about technology’s ability to reduce costs, improve quality and increase output.

It is easy to assume that these productivity gains are made at the expense of workers.  In reality, this technology actually has increased demand for flexible, mobile workers with skills and agility that machines are not even close to matching.  While 26 percent of those surveyed said their businesses increased the use of automation and robotics in 2016, over 34 percent said they hired extensively over the same period just to keep up with company growth.

In fact, the HR leaders we surveyed indicated that a scarcity of skilled workers was driving employment demands in certain areas–like marketing, sales and IT/technical–where robotics will likely never displace the advantage of human intelligence.  Indeed, well over one-third of respondents anticipate hiring more workers in these areas over the next year.

But workers with the right combination of skills and experience are hard to come by.  Many workers are structuring their work hours in ways that allow them to work many different jobs, across several geographical locations.  As a result, more companies are rethinking their talent management to account for more short-term, offsite workers.  Of the HR leaders we surveyed, more than two-thirds (66%) said they are considering moving toward a talent management model that would more easily integrate contingent workers.  They see the shift toward flexible talent as a sound strategy that can help companies access a larger pool of talent, such as parents with young children and retirees who may not want a traditional 9-to-5 job. 

For some commentators, the investment in automation and contingent employees signals an upheaval in the economy that will not benefit American workers.  But that perspective may be short-sited. In fact, automation and robotics can make U.S. manufacturing more cost-competitive, while increasing the number of high-paying, skilled jobs available for humans.  Instead of 50 foreign workers being paid rock bottom wages to complete a job by hand, the same job will be accomplished by one skilled U.S. worker running a robot and earning a middle-class salary.  This combination of increased automation and a more mobile, contingent workforce can reduce manufacturing costs and make it easier for companies to build their factories in the U.S.  The end result is a better educated, higher paid American workforce.

Change can be difficult. We are witnessing a major shift in the way business does business.  But most HR leaders see technology as providing workers with new opportunities (and also with new priorities). These recent changes in workforce management need not be seen as the catastrophe some suggest.  If Randstad Sourceright’s 2017 Talent Trends Report is any indication, robots are far more likely to benefit American workers than replace them.  

Rebecca Henderson is the CEO of Randstad Sourceright, one of the world’s leading human resources providers.

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2017/02/11/automation-can-revitalize-u-s-workforce.html

Automation can revitalize the U.S. workforce

In the face of growing workplace automation, a number of commentators have painted a grim future for American workers. But most human capital leaders see a much brighter future– one where automation helps revitalize U.S. manufacturing and increases the demand for skilled workers.

According to global talent management firm Randstad Sourceright’s survey of over 400 corporate HR leaders, automation and robotics are likely to have a positive impact on U.S. business growth in 2017, and will be one of the driving forces behind new hiring trends over the next several years. 

Regardless of how you feel about robots, the move toward automation and artificial intelligence cannot be stopped.  About 15 percent of global HR leaders say that robotics completely transformed their businesses in 2016, and more than double (31%) expect automation to have an even greater influence in 2017.     

Rather than feeling threatened by this new technology, nearly two-thirds (65%) of the HR leaders we spoke with said they see artificial intelligence and robotics having a positive impact on their businesses over the next three to five years.  Across all the major industry sectors surveyed, respondents were optimistic about technology’s ability to reduce costs, improve quality and increase output.

It is easy to assume that these productivity gains are made at the expense of workers.  In reality, this technology actually has increased demand for flexible, mobile workers with skills and agility that machines are not even close to matching.  While 26 percent of those surveyed said their businesses increased the use of automation and robotics in 2016, over 34 percent said they hired extensively over the same period just to keep up with company growth.

In fact, the HR leaders we surveyed indicated that a scarcity of skilled workers was driving employment demands in certain areas–like marketing, sales and IT/technical–where robotics will likely never displace the advantage of human intelligence.  Indeed, well over one-third of respondents anticipate hiring more workers in these areas over the next year.

But workers with the right combination of skills and experience are hard to come by.  Many workers are structuring their work hours in ways that allow them to work many different jobs, across several geographical locations.  As a result, more companies are rethinking their talent management to account for more short-term, offsite workers.  Of the HR leaders we surveyed, more than two-thirds (66%) said they are considering moving toward a talent management model that would more easily integrate contingent workers.  They see the shift toward flexible talent as a sound strategy that can help companies access a larger pool of talent, such as parents with young children and retirees who may not want a traditional 9-to-5 job. 

For some commentators, the investment in automation and contingent employees signals an upheaval in the economy that will not benefit American workers.  But that perspective may be short-sited. In fact, automation and robotics can make U.S. manufacturing more cost-competitive, while increasing the number of high-paying, skilled jobs available for humans.  Instead of 50 foreign workers being paid rock bottom wages to complete a job by hand, the same job will be accomplished by one skilled U.S. worker running a robot and earning a middle-class salary.  This combination of increased automation and a more mobile, contingent workforce can reduce manufacturing costs and make it easier for companies to build their factories in the U.S.  The end result is a better educated, higher paid American workforce.

Change can be difficult. We are witnessing a major shift in the way business does business.  But most HR leaders see technology as providing workers with new opportunities (and also with new priorities). These recent changes in workforce management need not be seen as the catastrophe some suggest.  If Randstad Sourceright’s 2017 Talent Trends Report is any indication, robots are far more likely to benefit American workers than replace them.  

Rebecca Henderson is the CEO of Randstad Sourceright, one of the world’s leading human resources providers.

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2017/02/11/automation-can-revitalize-u-s-workforce.html

Carrier to ultimately cut some of jobs Trump saved

Carrier to ultimately cut some of jobs Trump saved – Dec. 8, 2016 by Chris Isidore   @CNNMoney December 9, 2016: 8:16 AM ET ‘;

for (i = 0; i 4)

afterParagraphFour = true;

currentParagraph = storytext.childNodes[i];

heights += currentParagraph.clientHeight;

if (heights >= limit && insertAfterThisParagraphIndex === -1)

insertAfterThisParagraphIndex = SMARTASSET.setDivIndex(i);

console.log(“insert after paragraph number ” + i);

console.log(“HEIGHTS = ” + heights);

console.log(“LIMIT = ” + limit);

/* div with id=”ie_column” */

else if (storytext.childNodes[i].nodeName.toLowerCase() === ‘div’ &&

storytext.childNodes[i].id !== “undefined” &&

storytext.childNodes[i].id ===”ie_column”)

heights = 0;

limit = 80;

insertAfterThisParagraphIndex = -1

/* embeds from twitter, facebook, youtube */

else if (storytext.childNodes[i].nodeName.toLowerCase() === ‘div’ &&

storytext.childNodes[i].classList.contains(’embed’))

heights = 0;

limit = 80;

insertAfterThisParagraphIndex = -1

/* cnn video player */

else if (storytext.childNodes[i].nodeName.toLowerCase() === ‘div’ &&

storytext.childNodes[i].classList.contains(‘cnnplayer’))

heights = 0;

limit = 80;

insertAfterThisParagraphIndex = -1

/* images */

else if (storytext.childNodes[i].nodeName.toLowerCase() === ‘img’)

heights = 0;

limit = 80;

/* images stored in figure tags */

else if (storytext.childNodes[i].nodeName.toLowerCase() === ‘figure’)

heights = 0;

limit = 80;

if (heights >= 875 && afterParagraphFour)

storytext.childNodes[insertAfterThisParagraphIndex].insertAdjacentHTML(‘afterend’, smartAssetDiv);

smartasset = document.getElementById(‘smartasset-article’);

smartasset.style.float = ‘left’; // allows module to have text float to right

smartasset.style.marginRight =’20px’;

smartasset.style.marginBottom =’25px’;

SMARTASSET.setSmartAssetScript = function()

console.log(‘starting setSmartAssetScript’);

SA = document.SA ;

SMARTASSET.setSmartAssetDiv();

SMARTASSET.setSmartAssetScript();

But that has a big down side for some of the workers in Indianapolis.

Most of that money will be invested in automation said to Greg Hayes, CEO of United Technologies, Carrier’s corporate parent. And that automation will replace some of the jobs that were just saved.

“We’re going to…automate to drive the cost down so that we can continue to be competitive,” he said on an interview on CNBC earlier this week. “Is it as cheap as moving to Mexico with lower cost labor? No. But we will make that plant competitive just because we’ll make the capital investments there. But what that ultimately means is there will be fewer jobs.”

The decision to keep Carrier’s furnace manufacturing operations in the U.S. instead of moving them to Mexico will save about 800 jobs out of the 1,400 at the plant, at least in the near term. The company declined to say how many of the plants 800 remaining jobs could be lost to automation, or when.

Related: Robots threaten these 8 jobs

The threat that automation poses to jobs a big concern for Chuck Jones, president of United Steelworkers union Local 1999, which represents the Carrier workers.

“Automation means less people,” he told CNN’s Chris Cuomo on “New Day” on Thursday. “I think we’ll have a reduction of workforce at some point in time once they get all the automation in and up and running.”

Still, automation is the only way that a plant in Indiana that pays about $20 an hour can compete with Mexican plants where workers earn $3 an hour.

Related: Carrier to raise prices on furnaces and air conditioners

The number of U.S. manufacturing jobs in the U.S. has declined sharply thanks in large part to more efficient factories.

“You can’t just blame cheap labor [outside the U.S.],” said Dan Miklovic, principal analyst with LNS research. “Certainly many of the jobs that we’ve lost, especially in more sophisticated industries, it’s not so much that they’ve been offshored, but it has been automation that replaced them. We use a lot more robots to build cars.”

Related: The manufacturing boom Donald Trump ignores

All together, U.S. factories are actually producing more products today than they did in the post-World War II era, according to the Federal Reserve’s reading on manufacturing output. Output at U.S. factories is up 150% in last 40 years. But U.S. manufacturing jobs have plunged by more than 30% in that same period. And automation is a big reason why.

And it’s not a trend that’s going to end with Carrier or even with manufacturers.

A recent study by McKinsey & Co. said that 45% of the tasks that U.S. workers are currently paid to perform can be automated by existing technology. That represents about $2 trillion in annual wages.

CNNMoney (New York) First published December 8, 2016: 4:14 PM ET

Terms & Conditions apply

NMLS #1136

http://money.cnn.com/2016/12/08/news/companies/carrier-jobs-automation/index.html